News — Food Facts

Gluten Free Oatmeal vs. American Standard Oatmeal

Food Facts

Do you understand the difference?  American Farmers, crop rotate to give the land a break, so they plant a different crop each year.  If a farmer plants wheat and then plants oats the next year there can be wheat that pops up the next year and cross contaminate the oats crop.  They also then send this crop to manufactures that process more than just oats.  So the oatmeal gets contaminated.  Most of this product can contain up to 2000 ppm of gluten. Now we have 5 manufactures that do just oats.  Their farmers grow in fields that just grow oats.  They...

Read more →


Flax Seed is a Super Food

Food Facts

All Good Magazine puts Flax in the Super Food Category with Chia Seeds and Quinoa.  I love Chia Seeds and Flax, not alot of experience with Quinoa, I have it in my pantry and have made it a few times.  Not sure about it from the standpoint of flavor profiles.  As everyone knows I am big in to deep rich flavors in food.  I want everything in food to make an impact for my tastebuds.  Quinoa just has not done that for me but maybe it is all in the cooking principles I am using with it.  I have tried it...

Read more →


What Does It Mean To Be Too Acidic: When Talking About Your Health

Food Facts

Food throws off the acid in our body, so can water.  Why does it matter and how can you change it?  Great Article  

Read more →


Decoding Labels

Food Facts

I am a great label reader but there is still misconceptions and "left-out" details.  The biggest left-out is bleach's and conditioners.  The conditioners make whole grain wheat products more palatable (softer texture like white bread).  Why do they do this, simple they can.  These items are not fully regulated, not saying I want more regulations, just more truthfulness.  Bleach is added to make products more shelf stable and the obvious, make products more white.  Not sure why we want white food but I guess its what we have become costumed too.  We should want to eat food with color, but...

Read more →


The History of the Brownie

Food Facts

The brownie, one of America’s favorite baked treats, was born in the U.S.A. Even though it is a relatively recent entry to the food pantheon—the recipe first appeared in print in the early 20th century—there’s no smoking gun. Evidence points to Fanny Farmer, who, in 1905, adapted her chocolate cookie recipe to a bar cookie baked in a rectangular pan. (The brownie is classified as a bar cookie rather than a cake. That’s because brownies are finger food, like cookies, and cake is eaten with a fork). There are thousands of recipes, both “cake” types and “fudge” types. Either is...

Read more →